Thursday, December 13, 2012

Senior balances campus and chapter leadership

The December Sound Bite is online. This story about Logan Fletcher, UND student body president, is featured.

Senior balances campus and chapter leadership

Senior balances campus and chapter leadership

Logan FletcherLogan Fletcher, North Dakota ’13, serves as the student body president at the University of North Dakota, representing over 15,000 students and overseeing a budget of over a half million dollars. He is a 2012 Ruck Scholar, past vice president of communication, past BMS chair, and is now the Phi challenge coordinator and senior marshal. Fletcher proves that you can be involved on your campus and in your chapter.
Sound Bite: When did you realize you wanted to be student body president and what inspired you to run?
Logan Fletcher: When I was a freshman, I met the student body president in my residence hall.  I set a goal to be elected my senior year early on.  My brothers and the Greek community are really what motivated me throughout the campaign and election, though.  It was an incredibly stressful six weeks, but when I came home to the chapter house at night, I had a house full of guys encouraging me to keep going. 
SB: What are the challenges of being heavily involved in two organizations?
LF: Sometimes I have to make a choice between spending a Friday night at the chapter or attending a conference or meeting out of town. But I've never felt that I can't be involved in both.  We mostly make our own schedules in Student Government, so if a SigEp event is my priority, it's rare that I can't make it work.
SB: How does your role on your campus help your chapter?
LF: If nothing else, I try to use Student Government as a way to recruit new members to SigEp and vice versa. A number of brothers are involved in student government besides me. I know I can hire or appoint them to positions, and we will share the same values and drive to succeed. Two other brothers have served on my executive team. One is a student senator representing Greek students, two are on our presidential finance committee, and two have represented UND students to the North Dakota Student Association. We've taken on these roles together to make Sigma Phi Epsilon a name on campus that's respected by students, staff, faculty, and administration alike.
I don't believe any of us have had to compromise our commitments to SigEp or our campus because we're just acting out the lessons SigEp teaches us. I also have the chance to connect younger brothers with leadership opportunities outside of the chapter and have had a lot of different experiences to share some insight.
Team
Fletcher, third from right, poses with his executive team.
SB: Tell us about how you balance your roles in both organizations and how being a part of SigEp has helped you.
LF: I have everything I need to stay organized on my phone and computer, but the emotional support and motivation I get from my brothers at UND and across the country is, perhaps, the most influential in helping me balance everything. It's hard to give up either of my roles when I read or hear about everything other SigEps are doing. The whole process of campaigning, being elected, and serving as student body president has reminded me that if we dive in, and actually make an effort to live by our principles, we'll be set up to reach our full potential.
Our Fraternity has helped me develop my leadership skills and taught me about self-improvement through our principles and the leadership events I’ve attended. Serving the student body at UND lets me put that into practice. In a way, it's  like homework to see how I'm doing in my development that SigEp leads me through, so I know that I'll be prepared for the tasks I take on after college. Sometimes I think it is difficult to understand how we can apply Virtue, Diligence, and Brotherly Love outside of the Fraternity, but working as part of the university administration, I get to practice doing that in the field I hope to work in after graduation.
SB: Share some advice for a younger brother wanting to get involved in student government while staying involved in his chapter.
LF: Start slow. Take on one responsibility at a time and make sure that you can handle it and maintain your academics as well. We're all students first and foremost, and our involvement shouldn't interfere with our goal of getting a degree, but don't be afraid to take a risk or two. For me, it was all about seizing opportunities when they came my way, having a plan, and knowing where I could go for support if I needed it. Also, remember that just because responsibility can bring challenges, it doesn't mean you can't do it.  It's important to stick with it and see your own potential.